Honey

Honey Effective in Killing Bacteria that Cause Chronic Sinusitis

Source: American Academy of Otolaryngology — Head and Neck Surgery

 

 Honey is very effective in killing bacteria in all its forms, especially the drug-resistant biofilms that make treating chronic rhinosinusitis difficult, according to research presented during the 2008 American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation (AAO-HNSF) Annual Meeting & OTO EXPO, in Chicago, IL.

The study, authored by Canadian researchers at the University of Ottawa, found that in eleven isolates of three separate biofilms (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and methicicillin-resistant and -suseptible Staphylococcus aureus), honey was significantly more effective in killing both planktonic and biofilm-grown forms of the bacteria, compared with the rate of bactericide by antibiotics commonly used against the bacteria.

Given the historical uses of honey in some cultures as a homeopathic treatment for bad wound infections, the authors conclude that their findings may hold important clinical implications in the treatment of refractory chronic rhinosinusitis, with topical treatment a possibility.

Chronic rhinosinusitis affects approximately 31 million people each year in the United States alone, costing over $4 billion in direct health expenditures and lost workplace productivity. It is among the three most common chronic diseases in all of North America.

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Mumps Epidemiology and Immunity: The Anatomy of a Modern Epidemic

Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal. 27(10) Supplement:S75-S79, October 2008.
Anderson, Larry J. MD; Seward, Jane F. MB, BS, MPH

Abstract:
The success of the measles, mumps, and rubella 2-dose vaccination program led public health officials in 1998 to set a goal to eliminate endemic transmission of mumps virus by 2010 in the United States. The large outbreak of mumps in the spring of 2006 has led public health officials to re-evaluate this goal and to recognize that the transmission and epidemiology of mumps in highly vaccinated populations may be different than anticipated. During 2006, a total of 6584 confirmed and probable cases of mumps were reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and most of these, 5865, occurred between January 1 and July 31. The peak of the outbreak was in April and seemed to be focused on college campuses in 9 midwestern states with Iowa having the highest attack rate. College campuses with mumps outbreaks included ones with 77% to 97% of students having had 2 doses of a mumps vaccine. Diagnosing mumps proved to be problematic in vaccinated persons (ie, laboratory tests seemed to be insensitive and some apparent mumps cases had mild nonclassic illness). The outbreak demonstrated that mumps can sometimes transmit efficiently in highly vaccinated populations and the clinical and laboratory diagnosis of mumps in vaccinated persons is more difficult than in naive persons. The reason for this mumps outbreak is not clear but probably results from multiple factors contributing to an overall increase in susceptibility and/or transmission.

(C) 2008 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.