MSG

MSG in Vaccines

 MSG is found in vaccines and it is used as a stabilizer which is an ingredient to keep the virus alive. Essentially, all viral vaccines have free glutamic acid because it is used to feed the live virus. Stabilizers are also added to stabilize the vaccine against temperature variations or a freeze-drying process.

Since we already know the blood brain barrier is not fully developed in young children, to protect the brain against toxins that enter the blood, glutamic acid can penetrate the placental barrier.

 

 Vaccines that contain MSG are:

 

Varivax or otherwise known as the Chicken Pox vaccine. This vaccine contains L-monosodium glutamate and hydrolyzed gelatin.

 

Measles, Mumps, and Rubella (M-M-R) vaccine. The growth medium for Measles and Mumps contains amino acids and glutamate.  The medium for Rubella includes amino acids and hydrolyzed gelatin.  According to the package insert the reconstituted vaccine for subcutaneous administration includes hydrolyzed gelatin.

 

 M-R Vaccine (Measles and Rubella) contains hydrolyzed gelatin.
Attenuvax (Measles) hydrolyzed gelatin.

Biavax (Rubella) hydrolyzed gelatin.

JE-VAX (Japanese Encephalitis) gelatin.

Prevnar ( Pneumococcal– 7 Valent Conjugate Vaccine) soy protein, yeast.

YF-VAX (Yellow Fever ) gelatin.

 FluMist Vaccine (nasal) monosodium glutamate.

 

 Keep in mind that amino acids such as glutamic acid, aspartic acid, and L-cysteine are all neurotoxins.  All hydrolyzed proteins, such as the hydrolyzed gelatin, contain some processed free glutamic acid (MSG), aspartic acid, and L-cysteine. Gelatin and any ingredients that use ‘Hydrolyzed’ contain Glutamate.

  

Risks of FluMist Vaccine
By Dr. Sherri Tenpenny

 

“… The risk that the vaccine may contain contaminant avian retroviruses still remains. In addition, a stabilizing buffer containing potassium phosphate, sucrose (table sugar) and nearly 0.5 mg of monosodium glutamate (MSG) is added to each dose.

 

“One of the most troubling concerns over the injection of this “chemical soup” is the potential for the viruses to enter directly into the brain. At the top of the nasal passages is a paper-thin bone called the cribriform plate. The olfactory nerves pass through this bone and line the nasal passages, carrying messenger molecules to the brain that are identified as “smells” familiar to us. The olfactory tract has long been recognized as a direct pathway to the brain. Intranasal injection of certain viruses has resulted in a serious brain infection called encephalitis, presumably by direct infection of the olfactory neurons that carried the viruses to the brain. [19] Time will tell whether the live viruses in FluMist will become linked to cases of encephalitis.”

 

 Registry of Toxic Effects of Chemical Substances lists glutamic acid as a toxin:

The Registry of Toxic Effects of Chemical Substances Glutamic acid, monosodium salt, L – (+) – RTECS #: MA1575000, CAS #: 142-47-2 can be found here.

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CDC: Better Tracking of Hib Needed

CDC: Better Tracking of Hib Needed

haemophilus_influenzae_cdc

Federal health officials are urging doctors and state agencies to be more careful in suspected cases of invasive Haemophilus influenzae type B (HiB) in children younger than 5, largely due to a continuing vaccine shortage that is expected to continue until the middle of 2009.

The vaccine protects against Hib disease (Haemophilus influenza type b) a bacterium estimated to be responsible for some three million serious illnesses and an estimated 386,000 deaths every year, mainly through meningitis and pneumonia.

There are varying forms of serotypes of H. influenzae, says Michael Jackson, an epidemiologist with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The current vaccine helps to prevent type B, at one time the most common cause of bacterial meningitis in children.

But the reporting of serotypes to the CDC has been inconsistent with an estimated 40 percent of cases lacking such information, Dr. Jackson said.

“Without the serotype,” says Dr. Jackson, “we are unable to know if it’s type B, which is the type we are most concerned about, or another type that is less worrisome.”

The vaccine shortage began in December 2007 when Merck recalled 1.2 million doses of the vaccine. The voluntary recall began after the Merck found a bacterial contamination, Bacillus cereus on vaccine manufacturing equipment at its Pennsylvania plant.

The company has recently modified its manufacturing process, delaying vaccine availability until the middle of next year, said a spokeswoman for Merck.

While there is enough Hib vaccine to supply infants with a first series of shots, the shortage means children are going longer without the booster shots usually given after their first birthday, said CDC officials.

Agency officials encourage state and hospital laboratories, health departments and doctors to do serotyping of blood or spinal fluid specimens in a timely manner and report findings to the CDC.

The full report is published in the CDC’s weekly MMWR report on November 21, 2008.